Courses

WTRM 101 WATER/WASTEWATER TECH INTRO
Description: This course constitutes an introduction to Water-Wastewater- Distribution Industry. Topics include industry careers, required certifications, hydrologic cycle, watersheds, water/wastewater treatment methods, valves and equipment, as well as industry standard math formulas and conversion factors. ADVISORY: Eligible for Mathematics 205.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Describe how to engage in industry networking, including acronyms utilized throughout the industry, career opportunities, as well as state and voluntary certifications and their issuing organizations.
2. Outline the components of the hydrologic cycle, including the characteristics of water. public health and water quality.
3. Describe the key aspects of surface water, such as surface water development, water sheds and intake structures.
4. Outline the primary water industry disinfection methods, including three forms of chlorine, chlorine safety, as well as PH scale and measurement.
5. Define the key aspects of ground water, including ground water development. wells. and the similarities between water and wastewater treatment processes.
6. Describe how water is used. Industrial, Commercial, and Domestic Water Use. Variations in Water Use. Basic Math.
7. Explain relevant pipelines and couplings, including pipeline trenching and installation, in addition to an appreciation for local water issues, such as nitrate contamination and salt water intrusion.
8. Discuss the relevant pumps, valves and flow meters used in the water industry.
Student Performance Objectives
Describe the concept of networking potential. Understand industry standard acronyms. Recognize professional organizations and the certifications offered. Recognize State Organizations and the Certifications Offered. Identify Career Opportunities Locally, State Wide, and Nationally.
Outline the phases of the hydrologic cycle. Identify the characteristics of water. Appreciate how water is critical to public health. Describe the need for water quality standards. Recognize and apply industry standard basic math formulas and conversions.
Identify the various forms of surface water. Identify methods of surface water development. Describe the key factors associated with watersheds. Understand the utilized types of intake structures and overall systems operation. Calculate areas and volumes. Convert cubic feet to gallons to pounds. Calculate linear feet measurements, perimeters and circumference.
Identify and describe disinfection methods used in the water and wastewater industry. Understand the 3 Forms of chlorine that are widely used (gas, liquid, dry). Describe the safe handling and use of chlorine and personal protection equipment required. Define how PH is measured and what each end of the PH scale represents. Calculate pounds of chlorine needed based on the percent strength of the chlorine used (gas, liquid, dry)
Identify the various forms of ground water. Identify various methods of ground water development. Describe and define water bearing formations and aquifers. Identify various types of wells and mechanical parts of the system. Describe the similarities of treatment processes used both in the water and wastewater industry. Calculate well drawdown, specific yield, static water level and pumping water level. Calculate PSI.
Identify the various uses of water. Describe the production and use of water based on the type of industry. Define the flow dynamics of water use based on time of day. Define per capita water use. Calculate total volume of water used and percent use by industry. Calculate population equivalents.
S Identify the various types and use of pipes. Identify the various couplings used for joining pipes. Outline the trenching/shoring requirements for underground pipe installation. Identify various types of pipe runs and placement of mechanical joints and kicker blocks. Describe overdraft conditions which can lead to \salt \water intrusion. Describe how nitrate contamination is caused from multiple sources. Calculate percent (%) removal/efficiency of treatment processes. Calculate detention time.
Identify and describe the different types of pumps, valves, flow meters, and flow measurement and recording devices in the water/wastewater industry. Calculate the velocity of moving water. Convert temperature from degrees Fahrenheit to Centigrade, and from degrees Centigrade to Fahrenheit. Demonstrate the ability to manipulate dose, demand and residual formulas as applicable.
WTRM 102 WATER/WASTEWATER MATH 1
Description: This course covers basic math concepts used in the water- wastewater-distribution industry. Topics include industry standard formulas, conversion factors, fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios, area and volume. ADVISORY: Eligible for Mathematics 205.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Apply mathematics such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division with whole numbers, decimals, and fractions used in the Water Industry.
2. Utilize industry standard formula sheets and conversion factors. Convert cubic feet to gallons to pounds. Calculate the surface area in square feet of tanks and vessels.
3. Calculate linear feet measurements, perimeters, and circumferences of tanks, vessels, and weirs. Calculate volume in cubic feet of tanks and vessels
4. Calculate area in acres, volume in acre feet and convert square feet into acres, and cubic feet into acre feet. Calculate percent removal/efficiency of treatment processes. Identify peak flow, minimum flow, and calculate average daily flow.
5. Calculate average industrial, commercial, and domestic water uses. Calculate gallons per day per capita. Calculate population equivalents. Calculate detention time for tanks and vessels.
6. Calculate PSI in a well, tank or vessel. Convert feet of head into PSI. Calculate well draw down. Calculate temperature conversions from degrees Fahrenheit to Centigrade, and Centigrade to Fahrenheit
7. Calculate dose, demand, residual in chemical application. Utilize the pounds formula to calculate pounds of chemicals, sludge and bacteria in the system. Calculate surface loading rate in gallons/day per square foot. Calculate weir overflow rate in gallons/day per linear foot of weir.
8. Convert cubic feet into cubic yards. Calculate area, volume, gallons, and cubic yards of trapezoid shaped canals. Calculate velocity of moving water.
Student Performance Objectives
Application of basic math concepts as they relate to Industry standard calculations.
Identification and application of formulas needed to successfully solve word problems. Students will manipulate conversion factors to convert Cubic Feet to Gallons to Pounds. Students will solve problems using the Pounds Formula.
Identification and application of formulas needed to successfully solve word problems.



WTRM 103 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICAL AND INSTRUMENTATION PROCESSES
Description: Introduction to basic electrical theory, applications, common uses and real world examples of control systems and instrumentation used in water distribution, water, and wastewater treatment plants including switches, relays, alarms, motors, instrumentation, valve actuators, computers and communications. ADVISORY: WTRM 101 Introduction to Water-Wastewater Technology; WTRM 102 Beginning Water-Wastewater Mathematics.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Explain basic electrical theory and components, such as resistors, capacitors and inductors.
2. Outline the basic components of AC electricity.
3. Explain the concept of pressure as it relates to electrical and instrumentation processes in the water industry.
4. Describe the concept of level as it relates to electrical and instrumentation processes in the water industry.
5. Explain the concept of flow as it relates to electrical and instrumentation processes in the water industry.
6. Outline the concepts of temperature and heat as they relates to electrical and instrumentation processes in the water industry.
7. Explain the concept of actuators and controllers as they relate to electrical and instrumentation processes in the water industry Actuators and controllers.
8. Explain the concepts of process control, calibration practices, including PID, zero, and span, as it relates to electrical and instrumentation processes in the water industry.
9. Describe the roles of programmable logic controllers as they relate to electrical and instrumentation processes in the water industry.
10. Describe the role of Supervisory Systems and Data Acquisition (SCADA) in the water industry.
Student Performance Objectives
Demonstrate basic skills with VOM meters, OHM's law, etc. to gain an understanding of circuit analysis and DC electricity including series circuits parallel circuits, and passive devices . (capacitors, inductors, and resistors)
Describe AC theory and evaluate AC electrical impact on passive devices and active devices.
Describe the importance of pressure instrumentation and theory as it applies to a water/wastewater utility.
Demonstrate an understanding of level instrumentation and theory as it applies to a water/wastewater utility.
Describe the importance of flow instrumentation and theory as it applies to a water/wastewater utility.
Demonstrate an understanding of temperature, and PH instrumentation and theory as it applies to a water/wastewater utility.
Describe the type of devices and controllers commonly used in a water/wastewater environment.
Describe the calibration process for instruments and actuators used to control water flow and distribution.
Demonstrate proficiency with PLC programming techniques
Describe the use of SCADA systems and applications in the water/wastewater utilities.
WTRM 104 MOTORS AND PUMPS/OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
Description: Theory of pumps and motors, identification of problems encountered, causes of problems, corrective solutions and repair procedures. Implementation of maintenance programs including scheduling and record keeping. ADVISORY: WTRM 101 Introduction to Water-Wastewater Technology; and WTRM 102 Beginning Water-Wastewater Mathematics.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Discuss basic fluid principles as related to pumps.
2. Outline the key principles of basic hydraulics.
3. State the key parameters and issues associated with centrifugal pumps.
4. Rotary pumps.
5. Discuss the key elements and operational issues associated with reciprocating and displacement.
6. Outline the key operational issues for special service pumps.
7. Describe and explain pump curves, including horsepower and energy mathematics.
8. Explain the concepts of cavitation and positive suction pressure.
9. Outline the basic components of AC motors.
10. Outline the concept of motor controls.
Student Performance Objectives
Describe fluid principles as related to pump operations theory.
Outline the parameters of water hydraulic theory as applied to pump operation in the water utility environment.
Describe the construction, operation, specification and repair of several types of centrifugal pumps.
Describe the construction, operation, specification and repair of several types of rotary pumps.
Describe the construction, operation, specification and repair of several types of reciprocating and displacement pumps.
Describe the construction, operation, specification and repair of several types of special service pumps.
Pump Curves including horsepower and energy mathematics
Interpret and select pump curves associated with different pump applications.
Describe the causes of cavitation and how to troubleshoot such issues.
Describe AC motor application as it applies to the water industry.
Select and design simple control circuits to control the distribution of water. Out-of-Class Assignments: Read Chapter 16 of Miller Motor Control book . Do a Design problem.
WTRM 105 WATER DISTRIBUTION 1
Description: This is a comprehensive course that teaches basic principles of operation and maintenance of a water distribution system. It course covers the sources of water; principles of design; installation, operation and maintenance of pipes, pumps, valves, meters, and other regulated hydraulic units. Operation and maintenance safety considerations are emphasized. This course is designed to prepare the student to take the State of California Water Distribution Operator exam. ADVISORY: WTRM 101 Introduction to Water-Wastewater Technology; WTRM 102 Beginning Water-Wastewater Mathematics.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Describe proper waterworks technology
2. Identify the primary functions and responsibilities of water distribution operators
3. Identify the sources of water available and their uses.
4. Describe the various types of storage facilities and operational use of each.
5. Identify the fundamentals of water distribution systems, and the hydraulic characteristics of the different types.
6. Solve basic mathematical calculations and conversions such as volume, water flow, pressure, and chemical dosage.
7. Compare types of pipes used and corresponding water quality issues.
8. Diagram a typical water distribution system layout.
9. Evaluate the impact of various water valves used in a distribution system.
Student Performance Objectives
Outline an overview of the water distribution occupation
Outline the specifics of a water distribution systems plan
Describe and compare different pipe characteristics
Describe and compare different types of valves in a water distribution system environment
Outline the challenges and procedures for installing water main pipe
Outline the critical aspects involved with installing a water main.
Outline the different types of tanks and reservoirs used in a water distribution system
Describe water services and other elements used in a water distribution system.
Demonstrate the ability to calculate and convert various water measurements
Calculate areas and volumes commonly found in water industry environments.
Calculate pressure and flow, as used in a water distribution system.
Describe and demonstrate an understanding of chlorine dosage and temperature calculation.
Outline the key simple hydraulic principles used in a distribution system design.
Outline traffic control requirements and associated safety issues.
Describe operational problems involved with running a water distribution system
Prepare an overview of administrative issues related to operating a water distribution system
WTRM 106 BEGINNING WATER TREATMENT PLANT OPERATION
Description: This is a comprehensive course that teaches basic principles of operation and maintenance of water treatment plant. The course covers sources of water; public health aspects of water supply; physical and bacteriologic standards of water quality; types of water treatment plants, water treatment procedures, operation, storage and distribution. This course is designed to prepare the student to take the State of California Water Treatment Operator exam. (T1, T2) ADVISORY: WTRM 101 Introduction to Water/Wastewater Technology; WTRM 102 Beginning Water/Wastewater Mathematics.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Solve basic waterworks mathematics calculations.
2. Identify various sources of water in California.
3. Evaluate various methods of disinfection as it relates to specific cases.
4. Assess and compare regulations relating to water quality.
5. Analyze and explain basic water testing procedures.
6. Define the procedures and components used in water treatment.
7. Evaluate the hazards and safety procedures related to water treatment.
8. Compare types of reactions as applied to water treatment.
Student Performance Objectives
Calculate dosage rates, area and volume, static head pressure, and unit and conversion factors.
Explain ground water and surface water characteristics, the hydrological cycle, and well construction and location.
Discuss different types of intake devices and applications, and watershed issues involved with surface sources.
Describe the concepts and applications of coagulation and flocculation, Perform a jar test, select the proper coagulant and determine the dosage, adjust chemical feed rates, and select optimum speeds for flash mixers and flocculators.
Identify factors affecting the performance of sedimentation basins and describe various types of sedimentation basins and how they work, start up and shut down sedimentation basins. Describe the components of effective recordkeeping for a sedimentation basin, as well as the safe performance of duties associated with a sedimentation basin.
Describe the various types of potable water filters and how they work. Explain how other treatment processes affect the performance of the filtration process. Discuss how to operate and maintain filters under normal and abnormal process conditions, and start up and shut down filtration processes.
Describe different type of disinfectants, chlorine demand/residual, chlorination equipment, as well as chlorine safety and hazards.
Outline the adverse effects of corrosion, describe how a pipe corrodes, select the proper chemical to control corrosion, describe cathodic protection to control corrosion, and troubleshoot to solve corrosion problems.
Explain the importance of taste and odor, identify causes of taste and odor, describe how to locate sources of taste and odor, and explain how to treat or eliminate undesirable taste and odor.
Describe the responsibilities of plant operations, including regulation of flows, control of process, recordkeeping, maintenance of equipment, emergency procedures, and energy conservation.
Explain common lab practices, including jar testing, collecting lab samples, and testing for common water quality properties, such as alkalinity, chlorine residual, chlorine demand, coliform concentration, hardness, pH, temperature, and turbidity.
Describe the difference between physical properties of water, chemical properties of water, biological properties of water, and the effect of radioactivity on water.
Outline regulatory requirements including the Clean Water Act (CWA), Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), and Basic Water Rights.
Explain plant safety techniques, chemical safety/MSDS, electrical safety, including ARC flash requirements, and confined space entry.
WTRM 107 BEGINNING WASTEWATER TREATMENT OPERATIONS
Description: This course covers an introduction to the operations and maintenance of a wastewater treatment facility. Topics include industry careers, certifications, advanced wastewater treatment methods, valves and equipment, as well as industry standard math formulas and conversion factors. ADVISORY: Eligible for Math 205.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Describe how to engage in industry networking, including Acronyms throughout the Industry, Career Opportunities, State and Voluntary Certifications and their Issuing Organizations. Describe the application of basic math in Wastewater Treatment.
2. Discuss the basics of Wastewater Treatment, including the Characteristics of Wastewater, Wastewater Collection Systems. and associated Basic Math.
3. Define the differences between Preliminary Treatment and Primary Treatment.
4. Explain critical Biological Concepts, including those associated with Pond and Lagoons.
5. Discuss Secondary Treatment, Fixed Film Processes, Trickling Filters and Rotating Biological Contactors.
6. Describe Secondary Treatment, Suspended Film Processes, Activated Sludge, Combined Processes and Trickling Filter Solids Contact.
7. Describe the processes for the Disinfection of Wastewater, including Thickening of Sludge Solids.
8. Describe the components of Sludge Digestion, including Aerobic Digestion, Anaerobic Digestion, Sludge Processing, Biosoilds Processing and Biosolids Disposal.
9. Discuss Final Effluent Disposal, including Secondary and Tertiary Effluent.
10. Describe the roles of Laboratory Sampling and Testing, as well as Facility and Equipment Maintenance and Safety in Wastewater Plant Operation.
Student Performance Objectives
Discuss Networking Potential. Define Industry Standard Acronyms. Recognize Professional Organizations and the Certifications Offered. Outline State Organizations and the Certifications Offered. Identify Career Opportunities Locally, Statewide, and Nationally. Explain Industry Standard Basic Math Formulas and Conversions.
Define and discuss Pre Treatment, Primary Treatment, Secondary Treatment, Tertiary Treatment Stages. Explain the Different Types and Characteristics of Wastewaters. Describe Types of Collection Systems and Manhole Placement Requirement. Calculate Areas and Volumes. Convert Cubic Feet to Gallons to Pounds. Calculate Linear Feet Measurements, Perimeters, and Circumference. Explain the Pounds Formula. Calculate Velocity.
Describe Pretreatment Equipment and Functions. Understand the Different Stages and Need for Pretreatment. Identify Primary Treatment Equipment and Functions. Recognize Removal Efficiencies for Primary Treatment. Define Basic Primary Treatment Operation. Calculate Surface Loading Rates. Calculate Surface and Wier Overflow Rates. Calculate Detention Time.
Outline the Key Biological Actions in Wastewater Treatment. Identify the Common Types of Bacteria in the Various Biological Processes. Recognize how Temperature, pH, and Dissolved Oxygen Affect Biological Processes. Identify the Various Types of Ponds Used. Describe Parameters of Pond Classification. Describe Operational Controls of the Different Classification of Ponds. Calculate Hydraulic and Organic Loading to the Ponds. Calculate Pond Evaporation Rate. Convert Temperature from Degrees Fahrenheit to Centigrade, and from Degrees Centigrade to Fahrenheit.
Outline the Various Fixed Film Secondary Treatment Processes. Describe the Main Parts of a Trickling Filter. Identify the Main Parts of a Rotating Biological Contactor. Explain Performance Limits. Identify Types of Bacteria in the Bio-Mass. Discuss Sloughing (life) Cycles of the Bio-Mass. Calculate Hydraulic Loading and Organic Loading for the Various Fixed Film Processes.
Identify and explain the Many Activated Sludge Processes. Understand Performance Limits. Identify the Types of Bacteria in Activated Sludge. Explain Aeration Types and Requirements. Outline Return and Wasting Requirements. Define Mass Balance. Explain the Principles of the Combined Trickling Filter Solids Contact Process. Calculate Hydraulic Loading and Organic Loading for the Various Activated Sludge Processes. Calculate Sludge Age, SVI, MCRT, Pounds to Return, and Pounds to Waste.
Identify the Disinfection Methods Used in the Wastewater Industry. Identify the Equipment Used by Different Disinfection Processes. Discuss the 3 Forms of Chlorine Widely Used (Gas, Liquid, Dry) Explain the Safe Handling and Use of Chlorine and Personal Protection Equipment Required. Explain the Purpose for Chlorine Contact Time. Identify the Various Methods of Sludge Thickening. Describe the Various Types of Sludge to be Thickened. Calculate Thickened Sludge Feed Rates. Calculate Pounds of Chlorine Needed based on Percent Strength of the Chlorine Used (Gas, Liquid, Dry) Manipulate Dose, Demand, and Residual Formulas.
Describe the Various Sludge Digestion Processes. Outline the Aerobic Sludge Digestion Process. Describe the Anaerobic Sludge Digestion Process. Identify the Equipment Used and Operational Controls of Aerobic and Anaerobic Sludge Digestion. Discuss Sludge Stabilization and Digestion By-Products. Discuss the Main Safety Concerns Regarding Anaerobic Digestion. Calculate Volatile Solids Loading. Calculate Percent Reduction of Volatile Solids. Calculate Pounds of Methane Gas Produced per Pound of Volatile Solids Destroyed.
Describe the Various Effluent Disposal Methods. Identify Acceptable Disposal Methods for Secondary and Tertiary Effluents. Describe the Various Types of Equipment used for Effluent Discharge. Explain Effluent Reuse Requirements. Calculate Chlorine Disinfection Rates and Dechlorination Dosing Rates. Calculate Percent (%) Removal/Efficiency.
Identify and describe the Various Laboratory Tests Performed for Process Control and Regulatory Reporting Requirements. Explain the Measurement of pH and what Each End of the Scale Represents. Outline How BOD, Total Solids, Settleable Solids, Volatile Solids, Coliform Concentration, Turbidity, Volatile Acids/Alkalinity, Methane Content, Priority Pollutants, and Metals Analysis are used in the Operation of a Wastewater Treatment Facility. Discuss the Many Safe Practices Involved in the Successful Operation of the Facility. Identify Maintenance Needs. Explain the Difference Between Preventive Maintenance and Predictive Maintenance. Describe the Importance of Record Keeping and Log Books.
WTRM 108 WATER DISTRIBUTION 2
Description: Designed as the second part of an integrated sequence of two courses covering water distribution systems. Enables students to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the operation and maintenance of waterworks distribution system, including advanced calculations, management, safety and emergency response issues. Contemporary issues facing the water and wastewater industry are also explored in depth. This course is part of a series required for eligibility to take the State certification examinations; supports certification examinations for CDPH grade levels D3, D4 and D5. ADVISORY: WTRN 105 Water Distribution 1; WTRM 102 Beginning Water/Wastewater Mathematics.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Solve advanced mathematical calculations and conversions.
2. Identify and discuss the components of a water distribution system.
3. Discuss Water Quality requirements and regulations as they apply to Water Distribution.
4. Discuss appropriate Administrative applications and record-keeping requirements.
5. Design the level and type of disinfection necessary during maintenance and repairs of distribution facilities.
6. Calculate system pressures at various points within a distribution system and other hydraulic measures.
7. Classify the various types of meters used in water distribution and explain the advantages of each.
8. Illustrate the safety precautions and procedures related to water distribution.
9. Describe the different forms of backflow prevention and explain the need for backflow prevention.
10. Describe the parts and operation of a water well, pumps and motors.
Student Performance Objectives
Mathematically construct different water math problems applied directly to water distribution principles
Discuss Distribution components and appurtenances.
Describe chlorination techniques and associated equipment, as well as chlorine regulation requirements.
Discuss pumps and the relevant water distribution issues, including cost and operation.
Discuss and design traffic controls, trench shoring, and related safety regulations in a construction and operations environment.
Outline the physical, chemical, biological and radioactive influences on water.
Explain the types of records, legal reporting requirements for a public agency vs. an investor owned utility.

WTRM 109 ADVANCED WATER TREATMENT PLANT OPERATION
Description: This course focuses on advanced water quality control and treatment with emphasis on state regulations, EPA regulations, advanced mathematics and water chemistry. The course will include an in-depth study of treatment plant processes and their relation to current water quality regulations. This course will be helpful to those preparing for the CDPH Grade T3 and T4. ADVISORY: WTRM 102 Beginning Water/Wastewater Mathematics; WTRM 106 Beginning Water Treatment Plant Operation.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Solve advanced waterworks mathematics calculations.
2. Identify the various sources of water in California comparing the benefits and drawbacks.
3. Evaluate various methods of disinfection as they relate to specific applications
4. Describe laboratory procedures as they relate to advanced water treatment
5. Assess and compare regulations relating to water quality.
6. Define the procedures and components used in advanced water treatment.
7. Analyze the hazards and safety procedures related to water treatment
8. Analyze and explain advanced water testing procedures.
Student Performance Objectives
Calculate dosage rates, area and volume, static head pressure, and unit and conversion factors.
Calculate energy usage, filtration efficiencies, blending rates and advanced dosages with different specific gravities.
Discuss different techniques to treat iron and manganese, including phosphate treatment, oxidizing filter treatment , and eliminating plumbing corrosion.
Explain the fluoridation process, including the issues surrounding fluoride in the water supply, as well as how fluoride is introduced and dosed using positive displacement pumps and a saturator.
Discuss the causes water hardening, the characteristics of calcium, manganese, and other ions in hard water, as well as techniques for removing these chemicals.
Explain the associated chemistry and treatment process impact on scaling and corrosion, as well as other specialized processes to handle unique situations.
Explain the nanofiltration, microfiltration and desalination processes used to treat water, including any post treatment process needed with this type of filtration.
Outline the different waste categories and the proper disposal of wastes constantly dealt with in a water treatment environment , including mercury, arsenic, nitrates, manganese, iron and other waste by-products in the treatment process.
Identify common maintenance activities that need to be completed in the water treatment plant, and ways to track that maintenance.
Explain how SCADA controls are read and how they work.
Discuss different specific laboratory procedures used to address water quality issues for different types of treatment environments.
Outline specific EPA and California regulations addressing both the primary and secondary standards of treatment.
Describe how to effectively manage a water treatment plant from a business, political, strategic, and quality control perspective.
WTRM 110 ADVANCED WATER/WASTEWATER/DISTRIBUTION MATH
Description: This course is a continuation of the Beginning Water/Wastewater Mathematics course WTRM 102 and covers advanced math concepts used in the Water/Wastewater/Distribution industry. Topics include industry standard formulas, conversion factors, MCRT, SVI, waste/return, horsepower, well drawdown, capacitance, yield, belt press cake/filtrate, SDI, sludge age, gas production and digestion rates. ADVISORY: Math 205 Elementary Algebra and WTRM 102 Beginning Water/Wastewater Mathematics
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Apply mathematics such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division with whole numbers, decimals, and fractions used in the Water Industry. Review basic math concepts covered in the beginning class.
2. Utilize Industry standard formula sheets and conversion factors. Convert Cubic Feet to Gallons to Pounds. Understand the Pounds Formula.
3. Apply Trickling Filters and Rotating Biological Contactor Math.
4. Utilize Activated Sludge Calculations.
5. Apply Waste Treatment Ponds Math.
6. Utilize Chemical Dosage Calculations.
7. Apply Sludge Production and Thickening Calculations.
8. Utilize Sludge Digestion Calculations.
9. Apply Sludge Dewatering and Disposal Math.
10. Utilize Laboratory Calculations. Water Treatment Filter Calculations.
Student Performance Objectives
Apply basic math concepts as they relate to Industry standard calculations.
Identify formulas needed to successfully solve word problems. Manipulate conversion factors to convert Cubic Feet to Gallons to Pounds. Solve problems using the Pounds Formula.
Outline formulas needed to successfully solve word problems for unit process control.
Identify formulas needed to successfully solve word problems for unit process control.
Explain formulas needed to successfully solve word problems for unit process control.
WTRM 111 ADVANCED WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT OPERATION
Description: This course is designed to familiarize students with advanced wastewater treatment systems, including secondary and tertiary treatment, solids handling, disinfection, reclamation of wastewater, as well as laboratory study. The course prepares students for the CSWRB Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator examinations. ADVISORY: WTRM 101 Introduction to Water/Wastewater Technology; WTRM 107 Beginning Wastewater Treatment Plant Operation.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate wastewater operations in an increasingly complex manner.
2. Demonstrate competent and efficient plant operations through real-life decision-making examples.
3. Examine and describe wastewater processes as well as the fundamental concepts of wastewater theory.
4. Examine and describe wastewater processes as well as the fundamental concepts of wastewater theory.
5. Interpret and analyze performance calculations for wastewater processes andapply these techniques to real-life situations.
6. Identify the appropriate process control measures in making sound operational decision.
7. Apply control techniques to specific and practical wastewater situations.
8. Examine wastewater theory in practice through the case studies and analysis of current articles in the media.
9. Value the importance and the function of wastewater treatment plant operations in the protection of public health and the environment through applied theory to practice via case studies.
Student Performance Objectives
Utilize basic math principles and formulas as they apply to a wastewater treatment plant. This may include Tank Areas and Volumes, Flow Rates and Velocity, Milligram per Liter to Pounds, Chemical Dosages, Loading Rates, Detention Times and Retention Times, Efficiency and Percent Removal Rates, and Pumping Rates etc.
Utilize advanced calculation methods, including sludge and digester calculations, wasting rates, fixed solid calculations, etc.
Explain the principles of the activated sludge process; place a new activated sludge process into place; collect samples, interpret lab results, and make adjustments in the treatment process; determine aerator loadings and understand the application of different loading guidelines; describe each of the process stages used to treat wastewater in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR); and review plans and specifications for a sequencing batch reactor.
Explain how a sludge digester works and what factors influence and control the digestion process; recognize factors that indicate sludge digestion processes are not working properly; discuss the various methods of solids handling and know how to maintain and operate these processes; determine loading on sludge digesters and solids handling facilities; and develop an operating strategy for a sludge digester.
Explain how to properly dispose of plant effluents in receiving waters; develop an operation strategy for effluent disposal; troubleshoot an effluent disposal system; develop a receiving water monitoring plan; conduct an effluent monitoring program; and review plans and specifications for an effluent disposal system.
Identify the types of hazards that are in a wastewater treatment plant; recognize unsafe conditions and correct them whenever they develop; organize regular tailgate meetings; and develop the habit of always thinking safety and working safely.
Develop a maintenance plan for a wastewater treatment plant, including equipment, building, grounds, channels, and tanks; schedule maintenance at proper time intervals; troubleshoot equipment; start and stop pumps; unplug pipe pumps and valves; explain the operation and maintenance of sensors, transmitters, receivers, and controllers; and determine when you need assistance to solve a problem.
Describe how to work safely in a laboratory environment; operate laboratory equipment; collect representative samples of influents and effluents from a treatment process; prepare samples for analysis; perform plant control tests; analyze plant effluents in accordance with NPDES permit requirements; and record laboratory results.
Discuss the use of computers in treatment plants; identify tasks in the treatment plant that could be performed by computers; provide reasons which justify purchasing and using computers; recognize cautions that must be exercised by operators using computers; and evaluate both computer hardware and software.
Identify causes of variation in results; read manometers, gages, and charts, analyze and present data using charts and graphs, tables, and numbers; calculate arithmetic mean, range, median, mode, geometric mean, moving average, variance, and standard deviation.
Explain the importance and need for records; identify the different types of records, evaluate records, organize a report; and write a report.
WTRM 112 APPLIED HYDRAULICS
Description: Study of the hydraulics necessary in the operation of water and maintenance plants and systems. Consideration of the types of pumps used in water/wastewater service, their operational characteristics, required maintenance and the problems common to their use. ADVISORY: WTRM 101 Introduction to Water/Wastewater Technology; WTRM 102 Beginning Water/Wastewater Mathematics.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Outline and discuss basic fluid principles.
2. Explain the principles of basic hydraulics.
3. Describe the application and use of centrifugal pumps, rotary pumps, displacement pumps, and special service pumps.
4. Explain the applications of hydraulic accumulators.
5. Describe the power transmission application of hydraulics.
6. List and describe hydraulic power tools used in the water industry.
7. Explain the function and use of hydraulic cylinders.
8. Explain the function and use of control valves.
9. Describe the relationships between fluids, lines, and fittings.
Student Performance Objectives
Explain the foundation of fluid principles which support hydraulic theory.
Describe the practical application of water hydraulic theory in a water utility environment.
Explain the construction, and operation of different types of pumps used in the water industry
Describe the different storage devices that store liquid under pressure and explain how liquid stored under pressure can be used to accomplish work.
Describe fluid drives and liquid drives involving couplings and explain how they work.
Explain the principles and applications of basic hydraulic theory.
Identify different hydraulic tools using hydraulis with an emphasis on tools used for pipe and appurtenance repairs.
Describe the applications of different types of hydraulic and pneumatic control valves used to control water levels
Discuss the key issues associated with the installation and specifications of fluid lines, and fittings used in a hydraulic environment, including water line specifications for services, and main water distribution.
WTRM 113 BEGINNING WASTEWATER COLLECTION
Description: This course covers the proper installation, inspection, operation, maintenance and repair of wastewater collection systems. It provides the knowledge and skills required to effectively operate and maintain collection systems. This course also provides knowledge as to why collection systems affect treatment facilities and how they have a significant impact on the operation and maintenance costs and effectiveness of these systems. ADVISORY: WTRM 101 Introduction to Water/Wastewater Technology; WTRM 102 Beginning Water/Wastewater Mathematics.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Outline the primary goals of collection systems.
2. Explain why wastewater collection systems must be properly operated and maintained.
3. Describe the tasks that the collection operator is expected to complete to keep the collection system functioning as intended.
4. Describe how to inspect and test newly constructed sewer mains and existing wastewater collection systems.
5. Explain how to locate and evaluate stoppage problems.
6. Discuss the selection and operation of equipment to resolve identified problems and minimize reccurrance of problems on the collection system.
7. Explain why wastewater collection systems must be properly operated and maintained.
8. Explain both the method of selection and the application of various chemicals.
9. Describe how to organize and administer the operation and maintenance of wastewater collection systems.
Student Performance Objectives
The student will be able to explain the type of work done by collection operators, describe where to look for jobs in this profession, outline how to learn or determine procedures necessary to perform the collection system operator's job.
The student will be able to describe the problems of operating and maintaining a wastewater collection system, justify the need to operate and maintain the system, and understand what collection systems are expected to achieve.
The student will become familiar with basic mathematical concepts that are used in collection systems including area, volume, flow, and velocity.
The student will learn different procedures including traffic safety, vehicle operation, using gas detection equipment, confined space procedures, Electrical hazard prevention, fires, and noise protection.
The student will be able to inspect existing sewers, inspect new sewer installations, test for leaks in joints, taps, sewers, and manholes, provide meaningful reports to superiors on pipeline condition, and effectively use inspecting and testing tools including closed-circuit television, smoke testing, dye testing, and pipeline lamping.
The student will be able to identify types and causes of sewer stoppages; select proper methods to clear stoppages and clean sewers; record essential data regarding cleaning and cleaning operations; become familiar with equipment and techniques including Balling, High Velocity cleaning, Flushing, Sewer Scooters, Bucket Machines, and hand rods.
The student will understand how to safely repair or construct sewer lines and manholes; determine the need for shoring and describe shoring regulations; excavate, repair, and backfill service and main lines; raise a manhole frame and cover to grade; repair and install manhole bottoms; and seal leaky sewers by grouting.
WTRM 114 LABORATORY ANALYSIS FOR WATER/WASTEWATER
Description: This course is designed to support and understanding and application of water quality laboratory basics in a practical setting. It prepares students to perform chemical, physical and bacteriological examination of water and wastewater. ADVISORY: WTRM 102 Beginning Water/Wastewater Mathematics or Eligible for Mathematics 205.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Identify laboratory equipment utilized for basic analysis of water and wastewater.
2. Define terminology used for basic chemical, physical, bacteriological examination of water and wastewater.
3. Perform mathematical calculations required for basic laboratory analysis of water and wastewater.
4. Perform collaborative laboratory exercises using reagents and instrumentation.
5. Prepare basic solutions and microbiological media for water/wastewater examination.
6. Identify common microorganisms in water/wastewater.
7. Write a laboratory summary of experiments performed.
8. Research current issues related to analysis of water and wastewater that are performed and how they affect the general population.
Student Performance Objectives
Identify laboratory hazards, glassware, common reagents, and instrumentation, as well as laboratory documentation, significant figures, rounding, logbooks, and data sheets.
Run various experiments using the appropriate instruments.
Run experiments and know why solids are important in water quality analyses.
Run experiments and understand the relationship among these analyses.
Outline the different methods of examination (e.g. briefly discuss ion chromatography vs. ion specific electrodes vs. distillation/titration); why nitrogen is important in wastewater and water analyses; run experiment of ammonia analysis (or relevant analysis based on available equipment).
Explain the different microbiological tests for water/wastewater and when each one is appropriate to run. Discuss what the test results mean and how to interpret the results.
Identify the different organisms and explain what the presence of specific indicators means for a plant.
Measure free (residual) and total chlorine; explain how disinfection-by-products result from chlorination of a system; different forms of chlorine disinfection (gas, tablet, liquid); discuss hazards associated with using chlorine as a disinfectant.
Analyze phosphate using the wet chemistry method; describe differences between IC method vs. spectrophotometric method; how do endpoints differ in phosphorus; explain when you would apply phosphates in the treatment process (water) and when they are naturally occurring (wastewater)
Describe what a "blank" is and how it is used in analysis; prepare primary and secondary calibration standards; discuss detection limits, warning limits, and control limits based on control charts; explain why data is imperative for a laboratory to run with an analysis.
Describe how metals are analyzed using an AA/GFAA/ICP; explain the benefits and differences of each instrument; describe how samples are prepared before analyzing on instruments.
Run an experiment using a jar testing apparatus.
Explain SPADNS vs. Ion Chromatography vs. Ion Selective Electrode method; perform the wet chemistry method; determine why fluoride is in the forefront of water treatment and how it affects wastewater treatment 5/11/2012 4
Describe which organisms the laboratory uses, explain why bioassay testing important; discuss how treatment processes would be affected due to toxicity results.
Identify appropriate glassware, equipment, and discuss reagent storage and advanced instrumentation.
WTRM 115 SUPERVISION
Description: Supervisory aspects of public agencies and investor-owned utilities, including organization, decision-making, coordination, communication and public relations. Personnel supervision, including coaching, training, evaluation, discipline, team building, morale and grievances. Safety programs, as well as encouragement of safe conditions, actions and attitudes is also covered. ADVISORY: WTRM 101 Introduction to Water/Wastewater Technology.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Explain transformational leadership and how to implement it in a water utility to spearhead change and improvement.
2. Discuss how to create a foundation for organizational change through culture allignment, leadership, and strategy.
3. Outline the key elements for successful management in a competitive environment.
4. Discuss key approaches for improving employee performance and handling employee issues.
5. Explain the management challenges associated with working in a natural monopoly that is regulated.
6. Discuss the major approaches for measuring corporate performance, including data-based decision- making.
7. Outline how to apply benchmarking to other utilities' performance in order to improve your own utility's performance.
8. Demonstrate effective business writing techniques, including focus and purpose, audience, organization, and development.
9. Discuss the key elements of planning for organizational change and harnessing the positive power of change.
Student Performance Objectives
Discuss the leadership challenges, technology roles, the customer, the workforce, and the political realities associated with a water utility.
Explain what constitutes strong leadership skills and their impact on the Water Industry.
Discuss how to put together a competitive management plan that will work for all water utilities.
Outline the major differences and similarities between investor-owned utilities, and public agencies.
Discuss the skills needed for employee interviews and for measuring employee performance.
Discuss the approaches for identifying KPI's (Key Performance Indicators) and other performance data within a utility.
Identify accurate performance benchmarks for several different utilities and comparison of data.
Demonstrate effective business writing skills for use in a water utility environment.
Demonstrate effective communication skills in a manner that will positively motivate employees to do a better job.
Discuss various strategic planning models at all levels of the organization.
WTRM 116 ADVANCED WASTEWATER COLLECTIONS
Description:This course provides an in-depth understanding of the components of wastewater collection systems and includes the design, operation, monitoring, maintenance and repair of lift pump stations as well as equipment maintenance, safety/survival systems, administration and organization principles. ADVISORY: WTRM 101: Introduction to Water/Wastewater Technology, WTRM 113: Beginning Wastewater Collections
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Discuss lift station technology and how it works
2. Explain why wastewater collection systems must be properly operated and maintained.
3. Complete a detailed examination of what a collection operator is expected to do to keep the collection system functioning as intended.
4. Discuss how to inspect and test newly constructed sewer mains and existing wastewater collection systems.
5. Explain how to evaluate sewers for rehabilitation and/or repair
6. Outline the selection and operation of equipment to resolve identified problems and minimize recurrence of problems on the collection system.
7. Explain control strategies for pumps and lift stations, as well as how control equipment operates.
8. Describe strategies for the administration of maintenance and operation of collection systems.
9. Outline safety practices that are essential to minimize accidents in the field.
Student Performance Objectives
The student will be able to determine the location of lift stations; describe the requirements of a lift station; discuss the components of a lift station; indicate the advantages and disadvantages of different types of controllers; review lift station prints and specifications; Inspect a new lift station; keep a lift operating as intended; Determine the frequency of visits to a lift station; perform necessary lift station maintenance tasks; and prepare record forms for a lift station.
The student will be able to explain the serious consequence that could occur when inexperienced, unqualified, or unauthorized persons attempt to troubleshoot or repair electrical panels, controls, circuits, and wiring; communicate with electricians by indicating possible causes of problems in electrical panels, controls, circuits, wiring, and motors; Properly select and use the following pieces of equipment, Voltage Testers, Ammeter, Megger, and Ohmmeter; Describe how a pump is put together; Maintenance and application of pumps; operate and maintain a compressor; develop and conduct an equipment lubrication program.
The student will be able to evaluate the condition of a sewer; determine the need for sewer rehabilitation; Establish priorities for a sewer rehabilitation plan; identify the various rehabilitation methods; select the appropriate sewer rehabilitation method; implement and complete a rehabilitation project; notify and cooperate with the public during a rehabilitation project.
The student will be able to demonstrate awareness of hazards working in the collection system and identify potential and existing hazards; develop a safety/survival program; list the responsibilities of the different staff levels in a collection system agency that are responsible for a safety/ survival program; prepare and conduct tailgate safety sessions and monthly safety meetings; develop and implement appropriate safety/survival policies; accurately complete accident forms and properly maintain records.

The student will be able to explain the need for effective administration; develop goals, tasks, and procedures for an operating plan; determine lease and/or capital purchases of equipment; read the various types of maps used by a collection system; keep maps up to date; prepare and maintain records essential for budgeting, scheduling, and meeting legal requirements; and organize an effective public relations program for a collections agency.
The student will be able to organize an agency to operate and maintain a wastewater collection system; staff and equip essential units within the agency; develop priority lists for job assignments for units within an agency; describe the various types of equipment maintenance
WTRM 117 WATER USE EFFICIENCY PRACTITIONER
Description: This course focuses upon the efficient use and conversation of water in the following contexts: overall supply and demand; utility operations and measures; residential uses and measures; commercial, institutional uses and measures; and landscape uses and measures.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Discuss the primary aspects of water supply and demand, including supplier and regulator roles, supply sources, and overall urban demand.
2. Outline the key components of utility water demand characteristics, operations, and related performance measures.
3. Explain the major elements of indoor and outdoor residential water usage and conservation.
4. List the major elements of commercial, industrial, and institutional indoor and outdoor water usage and conservation.
5. Describe the key factors associated with water usage and conservation in the outdoor landscape., including water-efficient landscaping principles, water usage survey, turf-grass, and non-potable water sources.
Student Performance Objectives
Explain the key aspects of water supply and demand as they apply to urban demand.
Describe the key facets of water supply and demand as they apply to agricultural demand and the role of water conservation.
Outline the key aspects of water supply and demand as they apply to water suppliers and regulators, water rights, and both groundwater and surface water supplies.
Explain the key aspects of water supply and demand as they apply to urban water management plans, water shortage contingency plans, and major water systems.
Explain the key factors of utility water demand and its associated measures.
Outline the key characteristics of customer demand.
Outline the primary water conservation measures which can be implemented by a water utility.
Describe the key elements of customer billing, cycles, and rate structures as they relate to utility water demand.
Explain the key aspects of indoor residential water usage, including fixtures, appliances, toilets, and conservation measures.
Describe the primary components of outdoor water conservation measures and water usage survey techniques.
Explain the key aspects of indoor commercial, industrial, and institutional water usage and conservation measures.
Discuss the primary components of outdoor commercial, industrial, and institutional water usage and conservation measures.
Outline the key aspects of water usage in the outdoor landscape, including irrigation systems, plant material choice, and soil improvement.
Explain the key components of an outdoor landscape water usage survey.
Describe the importance of turfgrass types, horticultural practices, and turfgrass alternatives as they relate to water conservation in the outdoor landscape.
Explain the relevance of non-potable water types and the application of water usage survey techniques in the outdoor landscape.
WTRM 118 INTRODUCTION TO OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY
Description: This course covers the fundamentals of the health and safety associated with water treatment, distribution and waste water treatment operations. Subjects covered include introduction to safety, confined space, lockout- tagout, respiratory protection, heat stress, fall protection and traffic control. Each section will satisfy existing Cal/OSHA and other water industry related training requirements.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Discuss Safety Management Systems and IIPP
2. Discuss hazardous materials and Right to Know
3. Discuss confined Space and lockout tag-out (LOTO) safety
4. Discuss personal protective equipment (PPE) and respiratory protection
5. Discuss powered industrial truck safety
6. Discuss vehicles and tool safety
7. Discuss traffic control, trenching safety and flagging
8. Discuss trenching safety
9. Discuss facilities, maintenance and laboratory safety
Student Performance Objectives
Explain how Safety Management Systems work and how to create an IIPP
Outline the requirements for certification in Title 22 and how to use MSDS, signs, labels and other forms of hazard communications
Explain the dangers and how to work safely in a confined space. To understand how to use LOTO to block exposure to hazardous energy.
Describe how to select, use and maintain PPE.
Explain how to use PITs safely. Note: The student needs to perform an aptitude test on a PIT for certification.
Outline how to safely use key tools and do vehicle inspections.
Explain how to apply the DOT's regulations of traffic control in work areas involving traffic.
Explain the hazards of trenches and how to safely working in trenching areas.
Describe how to perform an EH&S audit on facilities. To also learn of hazards & safety practices in labs & maintenance shops.
WTRM 119 INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT & TREATMENT
Description: Industrial Wastewater Management and Treatment reviews various industries and their associated wastewater. The course introduces the characteristics of wastewater such as pH, total suspended solids, total dissolved solids, etc., and then reviews basic treatment methods that are used to remove the particular characteristic from the water. By the end of the course, students will be able to design a wastewater treatment plant by developing block flow diagrams which utilize basic treatment methods to achieve the desired wastewater quality. ADVISORY: WTRM 101: Introduction to Water/Wastewater Technology, WTRM 107: Beginning Wastewater Treatment Plant Operation
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Outline the key aspects of industrial wastewater, industry sources, operations, and wastewater characteristics.
2. Explain the important aspects of basic waste water chemistry.
3. Outline the current wastewater treatment methods and associated equipment.
4. Describe wastewater treatment system design, water analysis, equipment selection, equipment sequencing.
5. Outline the key components of waste water treatment system design projects and student group system design.
Student Performance Objectives
Outline the major sources and industrial processes which create industrial wastewater.
Explain the primary components of basic water chemistry which relate to industrial wastewater treatment, including acid neutralization, oxidation reduction and precipitation.
Describe the key factors required for effective wastewater treatment unit operations, design and use.
Outline the key approaches for wastewater treatment system design and configuration.
WTRM 120 POLLUTION PREVENTION AND STORM WATER MANAGEMENT
Description: Pollution Prevention and Storm Water Management reviews methods and regulations to prevent pollutants from reaching the waters of our rivers, streams and aquifers. It reviews methods of reducing pollutants in industrial wastewater, water reuse and water recycling. Additionally, it reviews the methods and regulations for storing hazardous wastes and materials. Lastly, it reviews the general stormwater permits for municipalities, industry and construction. At the end of this course, the student will have a fundamental knowledge of how to reduce pollution in our wastewater through effective water and process management, as well as appropriate hazardous materials and waste storage. This course also covers the implementation of methods required by the State's general permits to prevent pollution from entering stormwater runoff. ADVISORY: WTRM 101: Introduction to Water/Wastewater Technology; WTRM 107: Beginning Wastewater Treatment Plant Operation.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Outline the key elements of Pollution Prevention, Ingredient, and Chemcial Waste Storage, Process Design, Equipment Design, and Facility Design.
2. Explain the requirements of Title 22 , Article 10 - 14.
3. Outline the requirements of 40 CFR Part 112 Spill Prevention, Containment and Counter Measure.
4. Describe the major elements of erosion and sediment control.
5. Explain the required elements of a General Municipal Storm Water Permit.
6. Outline the required elements for a General Industrial Storm Water Permit.
7. Describe the key requirements associated with a General Construction Storm Water Permit.
Student Performance Objectives
Describe the key elements of Pollution Prevention, Process Management, Process Control, Equipment Design, Facility Design, Material Storage, Water Reuse, Water Recycling, Cleaning Processes, and Rinsing processes as they relate to pollution control and storm water management.
Explain the requirements of Title 22, Hazardous Waste Storage.
Outline the primary elements of Erosion and Sediment Control
Explain the requirements of a Gereral Municipal Stormwater Permit
Explain the requirements of a Gereral Industrial Stormwater Permit
Explain the requirements of a General Construction Stormwater Permit
WTRM 121 MECHANICAL MAINTENANCE
Description: This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic principles of mechanical equipment design, installation, operation, maintenance, repair, overhaul and replacement. The course emphasizes understanding the value of preventative maintenance techniques such as equipment monitoring, lubrication analysis, machine alignment and scheduled overhaul. ADVISORY: WTRM 101: Introduction to Water/Wastewater Technology.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. Explain the maintenance skills associated with: Equipment lockout/tagout.
2. Discuss the maintenance skills associated with: Lubrication and Bearings.
3. Describe the maintenance skills associated with: Couplings and alignment.
4. Explain the maintenance skills associated with: Pumps, Valves, and pipelines.
5. Discuss the need for a preventive maintenance history.
6. Outline the basic parameters of a preventive maintenance system.
7. Explain the CMMS approach to preventive maintenance.
8. Describe the reliability approach to maintenance.
9. Outline the basic parameters of predictive mechanical maintenance.
Student Performance Objectives
To give the student an overview of maintenance, including cleaning, equipment inspection, parts replacement etc.
To emphasize the importance of lockout/tagout as a first step toward any maintanenance activity and educate the student on procedures and techniques used for proper lockout/tag out. This will including mechanical lockouts, blocking, electrical lockouts, and other precautionary measures.
The student will learn bearing technology, lubrication techniques, bearing failure causes, and bearing replacement techniques for different types of equipment.
The student will gain knowledge on shaft alignment, coupling characteristics, floating couplings, rigid couplings, belt drives, and sheaves. The student will also understand potential costs of not doing this type of mechanical maintenance.
The student will become familiar with the makeup and maintenance requirements of centrifugal pumps, displacement pumps, reciprocating pumps and special service pumps. The student will also learn about different types of valves in a water system and identify repair and maintenance techniques for these valves. The student will also understand the basic concepts of leak repair and different techniques to repair and maintain pipe.
The student will gain insight into the reasons for preventive maintenance and the importance of a good comprehensive maintenance program.
The student will learn basic preventive maintenance concepts including maintenance planning, man-hour investment, associated costs vs. benefit of doing maintenance, and other reliability issues.
Modern Water utilities utilize a computerized maintenance management system to administer work effectively. The student will gain skill in the makeup, design, and operation of a CMMS system.
The student will gain a better understanding of keeping a system reliable with limited resources, and how to integrate these challenges into an effective maintenance plan.
The student will learn techniques that will specifically address predictive maintenances that can be done periodically to mechanical equipment in a water syste, water treatment plant, and waste/water treatment plant as part of an overall maintenance program.
WTRM 190 OCCUPATIONAL WORK EXPERIENCE/WATER/WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY
Description: Occupational work experience for students who have a job related to their major. A training plan is developed cooperatively between the employer, college and student. (P/NP grading) 75 hours per semester paid work = 1 unit. 60 hours non-paid (volunteer) work per semester = 1 unit. May be taken for a maximum total of 16 units. Minimum 2.00 GPA REQUIRED: Declared vocational major.
Student Learning Outcomes
1. The student will increase job skills in at least one of the following transferable skill sets:
Communication
Research and Planning
Human Relations
Organization, Management and Leadership
Work Survival
Measure: observation, oral or written report
MATH 106 Intermed Algebra
Year 1 - Semester 1
Prerequisites: MATH103 or 103R; or qualifying score on placement test.
5 Units
Outcome: Analyze, apply, and interpret quadratic and exponential functions.
Assessment: Examination question(s).
Outcome: Describe and interpret relationships between quantities using graphs, tables, symbols, and words.
Assessment: Examination question(s).
ENGR 010 Intro to Engineering
Year 1 - Semester 1
4 Units
Outcome: Prepare technical documents and the delivery of oral presentations.
Assessment: Document review and presentations.
Outcome: Analyze and present data in solving engineering problems.
Assessment: Project
Outcome: Demonstrate team work skill required on an engineering design team.
Assessment: Project.
ENGR 004 Intro to CAD
Year 1 - Semester 1
Advisory: Math 902 or 902P
3 Units: Lecture 2, Lab 1
Outcome: Generate two and three dimensional drawings using AUTOCAD.
Assessment: Timed examination and/or portfolio/presentation.
Outcome: Demonstrate proficiency in a minimum of 15 2-D drawing tools in a final drawing.
Assessment: Timed examination and/or portfolio/presentation.
CHEM 030A
Year 1 - Semester 2
Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103R or qualifying score on placement test and proof of Algebra II.
4 Units: Lecture 3, lab 1
Outcome: Complete basic calculations and problems by applying fundamental unit conversions.
Assessment: Examination questions.

MATH 010 Elem Statistics
Year 1 - Semester 2
Prerequisite: Math106 0r 106R or qualifying score on placement test and proof of Albegra II.
3 Units
Outcome: Given visual displays of the distribution of several variables, compare and contrast the distributions, including discussions of center, spread, symmetry, skewness, and outliers.
Assessment: Examination question(s).
Outcome: Given the description of a study in which an interval estimate or the result of a hypothesis test is provided, interpret the results of the interval estimate or hypothesis test.
Assessment: Examination question(s).
MATH 000D Trigonometry
Year 1 - Semester 2
3 Units
Outcome: Describe trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions symbolically, graphically, and numerically.
Assessment: Examination question(s)
Assessment: Examination question(s)
PHYS 002A General Physics
Year 2 - Semester 2
Prerequisites: Math 000D or Math 002
Advisory: Phys 001
5 units: Lecture 4 and Lab 1
Outcome: Apply core physical principles in conceptually describing the topics of mechanics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and sound.
Assessment: pre and post testing
Outcome: Set up an experiment, collect and analyze data, identify sources of error, and interpret results in relationship to physical concepts.
Assessment: lab activity
Outcome: Identify the essential aspects of a problem, formulate a problem-solving strategy, estimate the solution, apply appropriate techniques, test the correctness of the solution and interpret the results in relationship to physical concepts.
Assessment: problem-solving activity
ENGR 060 Engineering Problem Solving -MATHCAD
Year 2 - Semester 2
0.5 Units
Outcome: Solve engineering problems via MATLAB using a symbolic language to deliver a correct solution.
Assessment: Examination printout of program and solution.

Distribution 2
Year 2 - Semester 2

Waterwork Mathematics
Study of the mathematical principles and methods involved in solving problems related to water and wastewater treatments, distribution, and collection systems, including volume, flow rate velocity, pressure, force, unit conversions, dimensional analysis, chemical dose rates, dilutions, filter loading and backwash rates as related to water/wastewater technology.
Water Distribution Systems
Study of the operation and maintenance of a water supply and distribution system. Water sources, water quality, treatment methods, distribution operations, customer metering, pipeline installation and repair, valves and appurtances, storage tanks, and maintenance topics will be discussed. Mathematical and hydralic formulas and principles to determine flow, pressure, and force.
OR
Treatment 2
Year 2 - Semester 2

Waterwork Mathematics
Study of the mathematical principles and methods involved in solving problems related to water and wastewater treatments, distribution, and collection systems, including volume, flow rate velocity, pressure, force, unit conversions, dimensional analysis, chemical dose rates, dilutions, filter loading and backwash rates as related to water/wastewater technology.
Basic Plant Operations: Water Treatment
Study the sources of water and the public health aspects of water supply; chemical, physical and bacteriological standards of water quality; types of water treatment plants; and water treatment procedures, operations, maintenance, storage and distribution.
Electronics 111 Intro to Electronics Fundamentals
Define the following terms: electron theory; conductors and insulators; voltage, current, resistance, power; electrical energy consumption, kilowatt-hour meter; resistor color-code;
Demonstrate proper use of a scientific calculator to determine the following: series and parallel circuit values; DC and AC voltages and currents; metric prefixes and conversion factors;
Perform calculations involving Ohm's Law, Watt's Law, and series/parallel/seriesparallel circuits;
Demonstrate skill in the use of laboratory equipment: power supplies, analog and digital multimeters, function generators and oscilloscopes;
Define and calculate the following AC values: AC power; peak-peak, peak, rms, effective, and average values; frequency, period, and wavelength;
Define the following terms pertaining to magnetism and inductance: Inductance; Lenz's law; inductive reactance (XL ); applications for inductors; transformers; step-up/step-down and impedance ratios; practical applications;
Define the following terms related to capacitance: types, identification and applications; timing and filtering; unit of measurement; factors that determine the capacitance of a capacitor; capacitive reactance (Xc); RC circuit; and impedance (Z);
Explain the purpose and function of the following semiconductor devices: diodes; transistors; integrated circuits;
Demonstrate the use of semiconductor devices in the following circuits: power supplies; half-wave and bridge rectification circuits; digital logic circuits;
Observe and interpret diode and transistor characteristics in typical linear power supply;
Describe the basic digital logic elements in digital and computer-based electronics equipment: AND, OR, NOT, NAND, NOR, XOR and XNOR;
Demonstrate the ability to combine logic gates into a working logic circuit;
Describe typical transducers and their applications: microphones, loudspeakers, headphones, cartridges, magnet pickups and tape heads, and sensors;
Apply concepts learned to a working electronic system: AM/FM radio, power supply, digital logic circuit (example: digital clock)
Electronics 112 Advanced Electronics Fundamentals
Briefly define the following terms: electron theory; conductors and insulators; voltage, current, resistance, power; electrical energy consumption, kilowatt-hour meter; resistor color-code;
Demonstrate competent use of a scientific calculator to determine the following: series and parallel circuit values; DC and AC voltages and currents; metric prefixes and conversion factors
Perform calculations involving Ohm's Law, Watt's Law and series/ parallel/ series-parallel circuits; Kirchhoff's Circuit Laws
Demonstrate proficient skill in the use of laboratory equipment: power supplies, analog and digital multimeters, function generators and oscilloscopes
Define and calculate the following AC values: AC power; peak-peak, peak, rms, effective, and average values; frequency, period, and wavelength
Define the following terms pertaining to electric power; power, energy and power transmission; residential wiring system; three-phase power
Define the following terms related to inductance and capacitance: inductive reactance (XL ); capacitive reactance (Xc); RLC circuit; impedance (Z); resonance; timing, filtering, coupling and tuning
Explain the purpose and function of the following semiconductor devices:transistors; thyristors; integrated circuits
Demonstrate the use of semiconductor devices in the following circuits: amplifiers; oscillators; power control
Observe and interpret transistor characteristics in typical amplifier,oscillator, and power control circuits
Describe the operation of typical electromechanical devices and controllers: relays; motors; motor controllers; and processor-based controllers
Apply concepts learned to a working electronic system: AM/FM radio, amplifiers, oscillators, and power control (example: motor speed control)
Electronics 231 Basic Applied Electronics Mathematics
Develop a basic working skill in whole numbers, decimals and fractions.
Apply rules of signed number arithmetic to perform addition, subtraction, multiplication and division problems.
Convert fixed notation numbers into powers of ten, scientific and engineering notation formats.
Demonstrate the ability to convert all numbers into metric prefix format.
Develop a working skill in algebra, including the combination of real and literal numbers into terms, expressions and equations.
Solve for literal numbers in algebraic equations using recognized algebraic procedures.
Convert a given literal number formula or equation in order to solve for different values.
Develop a working skill in solving problems in right triangle trigonometry.
Demonstrate proper graphing techniques as applies to industry-recognized procedures.
Electronics 232 Advanced Electronics Mathematics
Analyze and solve typical algebra problems utilizing recognized problem solving procedures.
Plot a curve on X-Y graph paper of two or more variable and interpret the meaning of the data represented.
Solve right triangle trigonometry problems and apply these techniques to alternative current voltage, current and phase relationships.
Define the difference between common and natural logarithms.
Apply common and natural logarithms to electronics calculations, such as gain/loss and charge/discharge measurements.
Define the j-operator in electronics calculations and how it is applied to electronics circuit analysis.
Define and contrast rectangular and polar notation and how they relate to j-operator calculations.
Apply the rules of algebra to solve complex network calculations in advanced circuit analysis.
Apply the rules of algebra and trigonometry to both series and parallel resonance circuits.
Electronics 405 Transformers and Rotating Machinery
Describe the difference between single-phase and three-phase power.
Explain how a transformer operates and state the voltage, current, power, and impedance relationships associated with transformers.
Demonstrate how to phase a transformer winding.
Demonstrate how to connect transformers in wye and delta configurations and be able to compute transformer voltages and currents.
Explain the operation of DC and AC electromechanical generators.
Explain the operation of single-phase and three-phase motors.
Demonstrate how to connect single-phase and three-phase motors to a power source via a two-wire and a three-wire control circuit.
Electronics 421 Fundamentals of Electric Motor Control
Describe the construction and operation of a DC electric motor.
Describe the construction and operation of an AC electric motor.
Describe the construction and operation of a servo motor.
Describe the operation of basic start/brake/stop motor switching.
Describe the operation of basic forward/reverse motor switching.
Describe the operation, construction of, and troubleshooting of basic electric and electronic motor and stepped control.
Electronics 441 Sensors and Data Transmission
Describe the basic concepts of temperature.
Identify typical temperature sensors and describe their operation.
Perform the calibration of and describe how to troubleshoot various temperature sensors.
Describe the basic concepts of pressure.
Identify typical pressure sensors and describe their operation.
Perform the calibration of and describe how to troubleshoot various pressure sensors.
Describe the basic concepts of flow.
Identify typical flow sensors and describe their operation.
Perform the calibration of and describe how to troubleshoot various flow sensors.
Describe the basic concepts of level.
Identify typical level sensors and describe their operation.
Perform the calibration of and describe how to troubleshoot various level sensors.
Describe various feedback and control modes.
Identify instrumentation symbols and diagrams.
Describe mechanical and electrical connections to industry standard.
Identify instrument errors.
Describe the concept of data transmission.
Identify typical data transmitters and describe their operation.
Perform the calibration of and describe how to troubleshoot various data transmitters.

Programs available at Santa Rosa Junior College include Wastewater Treatment Operations Certificate and Water Utility Operations Certificate:

Wastewater Treatment Operations Certificate

Water Utility Operations Certificate